INTRODUCTION
Female customer in bookshopI love reading, and I love recommending books. Over the years I have recommended many to my blog readers. Click on the information bars below to find links to blog posts about what I’ve read from picture books to reference books and (almost) everything in between. (Note that for some of the sections, you will have to scroll up after opening the section.)
DIVERSITY READING CHALLENGE 2015

Pam, at the blog An Unconventional Librarian, has created a diversity reading challenge for 2015 that I am informally participating in. Over the course of the year, I hope/plan/intend to read at least one book in the categories listed in the graphic below, and will track my progress in the numbered list below that. If you want to follow along, check this page periodically. If you’d like to take up the challenge, I invite you to do so. The link to the original post on An Unconditional Librarian’s blog is here. DIVERSITY-CHALLENGECollage

Here are the books I have read in the 2015 Diversity Reading Challenge (check above for the key to the categories):

1. The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

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2. Walking Home by Eric Walters, Dash by Kirby Larson

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3. Gracefully Grayson by Ami Polonsky

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4.  El Deafo by Cece Bell,  Wonder by R.J. Palacio

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5. Dash by Kirby Larson, George by Alex Gino

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PICTURE BOOKS I RECOMMEND

図書館の子供Susanna Leonard Hill has a regular feature on her blog called Perfect Picture Book Fridays, where bloggers share picture book reviews augmented with activities, as a resource for parents, teachers, librarians, and all others who share picture books with kids. Most of the books in this list are ones I have shared for Perfect Picture Book Fridays, while some are books that I included on my blog even though they had already been reviewed by someone else for PPBF. Note to anyone who, like me, has worked in a library — WordPress had alphabetized the links using the initial articles, so I just kept that alphabetization, although my library heart cringes! Scroll down 10,000 Dresses by Marcus Ewert, illustrated by Rex Ray   A Closer Look by Mary McCarthy   A Northern Nativity by William Kurelek   A Walk in London by Salvatore Rubbino   Amelia Makes a Movie by David Milgrim   April Fool, Phyllis! by Susanna Leonard Hill, illustrated by Jeffrey Ebbeler   Backstage Cat by Harriet Ziefert, illustrated by Jenni Desmond   Chester’s Masterpiece by Mélanie Watt (although Chester the Cat would disagree)   Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes   Do, Re, Mi by Susan L. Roth in association with Angelo Mafucci   Dragon Dancing by Carole Lexa Schaefer, illustrated by Pierr Morgan   Dumpy the Dump Truck by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Tony Walton   ellington was not a street by Ntozake Shange, illustrated by Kafir Nelson   Elsie’s Bird by Jane Yolen, illustrated by David Small   Emily’s Art by Peter Catalanotto   ! (exclamation mark) by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld   Face to Face with Whales by Flip and Linda Nicklin   First Ballet by Deanna Caswell, illustrated by Elizabeth Matthews   For the Love of Music by Elizabeth Rusch, illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher   Happy Birthday to You! by Dr. Seuss   Hope is an Open Heart by Lauren Thompson, illustrated by photographs from various sources.   I’m Bored by Michael Ian Black, illustrated by Debbie Ohi   I’m Dirty by Kate McMullan, illustrated by James McMullan   Imani’s Music by Sheron Williams, illustrated by Jude Daly   In the Meadow by Yukiko Kato, illustrated by Komako Sakai   Kindergarten Rocks! by Katie Davis   Knots on a Counting Rope by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, illustrated by Ted Rand   Library Mouse by Daniel Kirk   Lights on Broadway by Harriet Ziefert with Brian Stokes Mitchell, illustrated by Elliott Hreloff   Little Penguin by Jonathan London, illustrated by Julie Olson   Llama, Llama, Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney   Lola Loves Stories by Anna McQuinn, illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw   Mirror, Mirror: a book of reversible verse by Marilyn Singer, illustrated by Josée Masse   Molly’s Family by Nancy Garden, illustrated by Sharon Wooding   Mom and Mum are Getting Married! by Ken Setterington, illustrated by Alice Priestley   Music from the Sky by Denise Gillard, illustrated by Steven Taylor   My First Ballet Class by Alyssa Satin Capucilli, photographs by Leyah Jensen   My Name is Elizabeth! by Annika Dunklee, illustrated by Matthew Forsythe   Nine O’Clock Lullaby by Marilyn Singer, illustrated by Frané Lessac   No One But You by Douglas Wood, illustrated by P.J. Lynch   Northern Lights: The Soccer Trails by Michael Arvaarluk Kusugak, illustrated by Vladyana Krykorka   On the Day You Were Born by Debra Frasier   One Duck by Hazel Hutchins, illustrated by Ruth Ohi   Over the Moon: The Broadway Lullaby Project by Many. Conceived and Created by Kate Dawson and Jodi Glucksman, illustrated by Many   Perfect Snow by Barbara Reid   Picture a Tree by Barbara Reid   Punxsutawney Phyllis by Susanna Leonard Hill, illustrated by Jeffrey Ebbeler   Rose’s Garden by Peter H. Reynolds   Scrawny Cat by Phyllis Root, illustrated by Alison Friend   Simeon’s Gift by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Gennady Spirin   Sky Color by Peter H. Reynolds   Symphony City by Amy Martin   The Art Collector by Jan Wahl, illustrated by Rosalinde Bonnet   The Art Room by Susan Vande Griek, illustrated by Pascal Milelli   The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse by Eric Carle   The Black Book of Colors by Menena Cottin, illustrated by Rosana Faria, translated from Spanish by Elisa Amado   The Circle Game by Joni Mitchell, illustrated by Brian Deines   The Gift of the Tree by Alvin Tresselt, illustrated by Henri Sorensen   The Legend of the Golden Snail by Graeme Base   The North Star by Peter H. Reynolds   The Sidewalk Rescue by Hazel Hutchins, illustrated by Ruth Ohi   The Very Fairy Princess Follows Her Heart by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Christine Davenier   The Very Fairy Princess: Graduation Girl by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Christine Davenier   The Very Fairy Princess: Here Comes the Flower Girl by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Christine Davenier   The Very Fairy Princess Sparkles in the Snow by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Christine Davenier   The Very Fairy Princess Takes the Stage by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, illustrated by Christine Davenier   Too Much Noise in the Library by Susan Margaret Chapman, illustrated by Abby Carter   We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Pat Miller, illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott   Woodland Nutcracker retold by Avril Tyrell, illustrated by Frances Tyrell   You are a Gift to the World/The World is a Gift to You by Laura Duksta, illustrated by Dona Turner

MIDDLE GRADE BOOKS I RECOMMEND
At leisureThere are many wonderful books written for kids aged 9 to 12 — so far, I have reviewed only a few of them on my blog. These are books that have particularly resonated with me. I hope you’ll like them, too! Scroll down     Down the Bright Stream by “B.B.”   Dragon: Hound of Honor by Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton   Fireflies and Shooting Stars by Ed Raarup   Oceanology by Zoticus de Lesseps (Emily Hawkins)   The Adventures of Tomato and Pea by Erik Weibel (NOTE: The giveaway is over)   The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips by Michael Morpurgo   The Bug House Family Restaurant by Beverley Brenna   The Great American Mousical by Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton   The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place by Maryrose Wood   The Keeper of the Trees by Beverley Brenna   The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles by Julie Andrews Edwards   The Little Grey Men by “B.B.”   Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
YOUNG ADULT BOOKS I RECOMMEND
Teenage girl reading book sitting on beach   I do NOT agree with the thought that adults shouldn’t read Young Adult (YA) or children’s books. There are some fantastic books in the YA grouping that can speak to teens and adults. I have featured some of them on my blog. I invite you to click and explore these books for yourself, then get yourself to a bookstore or library! Scroll down     Flygirl by Sherry L. Smith   Life on the Refrigerator Door by Alice Kuipers   Waiting For No One by Beverley Brenna   Wild Orchid by Beverley Brenna   The White Bicycle by Beverley Brenna (a Printz Honor book in 2013)
ADULT BOOKS I RECOMMEND
tablet computer on boat   Although in the past my blog has mainly focused on children’s books, I do read — and write — adult books as well! When adult fiction or non-fiction, biography, autobiography, or self-help particularly resonates with me, you’ll find it listed here. Scroll down     Live a Life You Love by Dr. Susan Biali [self-actualization]   Under One Roof by Barry Martin (with Philip Lerman) [biographical, reads like fiction]
REFERENCE BOOKS I RECOMMEND
Open Dictionary And Reading Glasses   There are some excellent reference books available for writers, for readers, for parents who want to get their kids excited about reading or the arts. I have featured some of them on my blog, and look forward to discovering and sharing more. Scroll down     Raising Bookworms: Getting Kids Reading for Pleasure and Empowerment by Emma Walton Hamilton   Show Me How! Build Your Child’s Self-Esteem by Reading, Crafting and Cooking by Vivian Kirkfield
POETRY BOOKS I RECOMMEND
poems word on wood stamps and booksSince my early childhood, poetry has been an important part of my life. My mother loved to recite poetry, and to tell me how her mother recited poetry to her. Mum taught me to hear and cherish the music in words. My fourth and fifth grade teacher often peppered his classes with snatches of poetry, or paused in the middle of our coursework to recite The Cremation of Sam McGee, or some other poem. When my mother was nearing the end of her life, in a nursing home, she and I still shared poetry with each other. Poetry can enrich all of life. Here on By Word of Beth, I occasionally share poetry collections that have brought special meaning to me. Scroll down   Julie Andrews’ Collection of Poems, Songs and Lullabies selected by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton, with illustrations by James McMullan