INTRODUCTION TO JULIE'S GREENROOM

Julie’s Greenroom is a delightful new Netflix series, developed by Julie Andrews, her daughter Emma Walton Hamilton, Judy Rothman Rofé and a host of others, in conjunction with Lisa Henson (daughter of the late Jim Henson) and The Jim Henson Company.

The series introduces the performing arts to young kids, specifically five young children — actually Henson puppets —  known as “Greenies,” who attend a performing arts workshop led by Ms. Julie, the character played by Ms. Andrews. Her co-star, Guillian Yao Gioiello, plays Gus, the stage manager. A host of performance luminaries guest star as former Greenies come back to teach master classes to the current batch of kids.

The series champions the arts while teaching viewers all the elements that go into making a stage production. I highly recommend it. It’s available on Netflix worldwide.

The links in this accordion will tell you more.

NETFLIX TRAILER

The trailer will give you an enticing taste of the program. Click here and enjoy!

MY BLOG POST ABOUT THE SERIES

Originally posted on February 27, 2017 as On Stage, Everyone! On With the Show! — Julie’s Greenroom

The curtain is about to open on an exciting new offering from Julie Andrews, Emma Walton Hamilton, Lisa Henson and a whole host of others, including brand new Henson puppets! It’s a wonderful opportunity for kids (and not-kids) to learn stagecraft and to experience all that the arts has to offer in a person’s life.

Julie’s Greenroom is a new Netflix series (13-parts for this debut season) ostensibly for preschoolers, but I think all ages of kids — and even teens and adults — will enjoy, benefit from, and learn from the series and the many guest stars who will be teaching various elements of stagecraft.

The premise is that Miss Julie (the fictional character played by Julie Andrews) and her assistant Gus (played by Giullian Yao Gioiello) run a center for the performing arts. They interact with a group of kids (and a duck) collectively called Greenies (played by Henson puppets). In each episode there is a guest star who teaches some aspect of the craft, such as Alec Baldwin teaching about acting, Joshua Bell teaching about orchestras, and so on.

The kids (and the duck) are, as I mentioned, Henson puppets and were created specifically for this series. I have seen the puppets in clips on television spots that Ms. Andrews and Emma have done, and they are absolutely delightful. It is also delightful to see Ms. Andrews interact with the puppets as if they were really kids. (And I can hardly wait to see the duck in action!)

The series debuts on Netflix on Friday, March 17, and will be on Netflix International so those of us not in the United States don’t need to worry about being left out.

You can see the official trailer here.

Read an excellent article in the New Yorker based on an interview with Emma Walton Hamilton and Lisa Henson here.

See the press release from the Jim Henson Company here.

And here’s a review (why yes, I *did* choose it because it mentions the duck).

DIVERSITY ON JULIE'S GREENROOM

The puppets in the series portray an amazingly diverse group of kids, showing that there is a place for everyone in the arts. This review celebrates this diversity, even suggesting that the series “might be the most diverse children’s show ever.”

From the New York Times: JULIE ANDREWS & EMMA WALTON HAMILTON on GREENROOM

Leah Rozen of The New York Times met up with Emma Walton Hamilton and her mother, Julie Andrews, in the Henson Company’s Creature Shop in February, and this article was posted on March 10, 2017.

From the New Yorker: EMMA WALTON HAMILTON & LISA HENSON TALK GREENROOM

Both grew up as daughters of famous people, both are extremely talented in their own right, both are celebrating the arts through Julie’s Greenroom. The New Yorker magazine talked with Emma Walton Hamilton and Lisa Henson about the project, and the article appeared on February 27, 2017.

From RogerEbert.com "WHAT JULIE'S GREENROOM TEACHES US"

The review of Julie’s Greenroom on the RogerEbert.com website is excellent. Notably, it shows the timeliness and deep importance of the series and its message, saying, “there may not be a better defense for saving the National Endowment for the Arts than this program, which has coincidentally arrived during a period in which the President of the United States has proposed cutting it for the first time in history.” You can read the review in its entirety here.