Waiting in the Wings — From Children’s Books to Musicals

October 3, 2012

Many successful children’s books have received a new life as stage musicals. Peter Pan has been soaring across stages on Broadway and beyond since Mary Martin first enticed Wendy and her brothers to Never Never Land. Mary Poppins began as a movie musical, written by the Sherman brothers, but has found a happy home on the stage as well. I suspect it will stay on the stage somewhere for a very long time… at least until the wind changes, and then it will be off to grace another stage and other hearts. Anne of Green Gables just closed its 48th season at the Charlottetown Festival, and is a staple on stages across Canada and elsewhere. Even picture books can become stage musicals, as Jennifer Kirkeby told us in this post about Llama, Llama, Red Pajama. There are, of course, many more.

Another children’s book is about to join the ranks of these musicals, with opening night on November 8th, 2012. I’ve been teasing you about what it might be during September. Click the magic words to find out what it is…

From the jacket flap description: …down, down, down, beneath a theater known as the Sovereign, there sits a long-forgotten architect’s model — the Sovereign’s miniature replica. In this secret space, an adorable troupe of theater mice busily prepare to stage their own show, “Broadway Airs.”

The book is The Great American Mousical, written by Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton, and illustrated by Tony Walton. It is now being brought to stage as a musical with script by Hunter Bell, music by Zina Goldrich, lyrics by Marcy Heisler, scenic and costume design by Tony Walton, and directed by Julie Andrews.

Mousical will be staged at the Norma Terris Theatre of Goodspeed Musicals, in Chester, Connecticut,  from November 8th to December 2nd. Tickets are available either online or by calling the Box Office at 860.873.8668. For more information, click this link (be sure to have your sound up).

On Wednesdays during October, I will be spotlighting this production, with posts about theatre, costuming, and a special interview with two people who are closely associated with the musical. Plus, there will be a GIVEAWAY of three copies of the book The Great American Mousical. All comments on my Wednesday posts throughout October will be eligible for the draw, with the winners to be announced on November 7th. (Full disclosure, these are hardcover remainder copies. There is a tiny black mark on the lower page edge, which doesn’t affect the appearance or the readability of the books.)

Now, some of you have been patiently (?) following my teaser posts throughout September. You now know the musical I was referring to. My mice would like to take a curtain call, so that they can be recognized for the talented mice that they are. (Note: their tails are tucked up out of sight, so that they don’t trip on them in the hustle and bustle of backstage.) First, all three, standing in order of appearance: The Producer, the Intern, and The Diva.

And to give each mouse his or her turn in the spotlight:

The Producer  — not Frosty the Snowman, but a mouse in a top hat, cloak and cane,

representing Don Q, the producer in The Great American Mousical

*  *  *  *  *  *

The Intern, a young mouse representing Pippin, the intern in the book and musical

*  *  *  *  *  *

and

The Diva, about to burst out of her costume, representing Adelaide, the diva in  Mousical

And now, on into rehearsals! Opening night is approaching!

24 People reacted on this

    1. The Producer thanks you. He would doff his hat, but he has a terrible case of Hat Ears… 😉

      You’ve been entered in the draw!

  1. *hearty hand clapping* for the three actors! Your teasers were fabulous, and I knew as soon as I saw the diva on stage, to which novel you were referring. It is very funny and teaches kids so much about Broadway! I sure wish this production great success and look forward to further posts, though I have my own copy, so I will opt out of the draw!

    1. I thought you’d likely guess at some point, Joanna. Thank you! I enjoyed doing the teasers very much, and will enjoy the “real” posts even more. Hope you do, too!

  2. very clever posts and brilliant sets! you are the designer of mini productions! watch out, tony! i, too, have the book, in fact several copies, so i wil opt out of the drawing as well.

  3. LOL @ myself. I just knew that was Frosty. But now I see the whiskers 🙂

    I adore the way you’ve done this. It’s been a joy visiting to see what new fun would be displayed.

    1. I could see how you’d think it was Frosty. I was bursting to say “Look again” but I’d told myself not to comment on any of the guesses, to keep the suspense high.

      Thanks, Angela!

  4. Oh, what fun! Of course I immediately followed the link and then mapquested Chester CT to see how far away it is. A little farther than I was hoping, but maybe doable on the right day. It would be fun to go see! I hope you do more teasers for thing in the future… that was fun! 🙂

  5. THIS IS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL! I read it yesterday, I’ll have you know (couldn’t stand the suspense) I was blown away. What an amazing idea. Love the producer, the intern and the diva, although I am partial to the intern. =) Looking forward to learning more about theatre in this month’s posts! Great job Beth!

    1. Pippin says thank you for being partial to him. The Diva tends to overpower lower-echelon mice, so he was delighted with your comment. And I say thank you for your comment! Hope you enjoy October’s posts!

  6. It looks like you are having a ton of fun and enJOYing great success! Congrats. And thank you for your kind words of affirmation and for stopping by the Corner!

    Barbara

  7. You did a great job with your teasers Beth. When I realized what you were leading up to, I decided not to comment so I didn’t spoil it for others. I hope you get the chance to see the Great American Mousical. I was so excited when I learned it was being made into a musical — the book is very worthy. I wish all involved a lot of success. Hope it makes it to Broadway or tours.

    1. Thanks, Pat — I suspected that’s what you were doing. You’re going to really enjoy the interview on the 17th, I can tell you that right now!

Comments are closed.